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Michigan State University Student Radio

Impact 89FM | WDBM-FM

Michigan State University Student Radio

Impact 89FM | WDBM-FM

Michigan State University Student Radio

Impact 89FM | WDBM-FM

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Goodbye, MSU | Adam Steinhauer
Goodbye, MSU | Adam Steinhauer
Adam Steinhauer, Marketing Director • May 10, 2024
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Goodbye, MSU | Adam Steinhauer
Goodbye, MSU | Adam Steinhauer
Adam Steinhauer, Marketing Director • May 10, 2024
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Eagle Spirit dancer Migizii Kwe dances with the audience at this years East Lansing Art Festival. Photo credit: Samantha Ku/WDBM
2024 East Lansing Art Festival Q&A
Samantha Ku, Writer/Volunteer • May 18, 2024

Heather Majano is the Art Festival & Arts Initiative Coordinator under the East Lansing Parks, Recreation & Arts department, she...

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The State – 04/19/24
April 19, 2024
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Goodbye, MSU | Adam Steinhauer
Goodbye, MSU | Adam Steinhauer
Adam Steinhauer, Marketing Director • May 10, 2024
View All
Eagle Spirit dancer Migizii Kwe dances with the audience at this years East Lansing Art Festival. Photo credit: Samantha Ku/WDBM
2024 East Lansing Art Festival Q&A
Samantha Ku, Writer/Volunteer • May 18, 2024

Heather Majano is the Art Festival & Arts Initiative Coordinator under the East Lansing Parks, Recreation & Arts department, she...

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The State – 04/19/24
April 19, 2024

A War of Words | “We Were All Wounded at Wounded Knee” by Redbone

A War of Words | “We Were All Wounded at Wounded Knee” by Redbone

Wounded Knee, South Dakota is a town that holds a lot of weight in the Indigenous community, as two massive events happened in the town. On Dec. 29, 1890, the United States Army killed over 250 Lakota as part of the genocide of Indigenous Americans in the middle of manifest destiny. Then, beginning on Feb. 27, 1973, members of the Oglala Lakota and the American Indian Movement occupied the town for 71 days in protest of the failure to impeach Richard Wilson. 

Later in 1973, the legendary band Redbone released their song “We Were All Wounded at Wounded Knee,” recalling both the massacre and the occupation. The beat of the song is set by a medicine drum, a traditional Native American drum that can be heard across the various pow-wows found in the Great Plains. The chanting vocals that are found across the song help to keep the seriousness of the track, even with the guitar’s wobbly sound. 

Despite how successful Redbone was at the time, this song was banned by several radio stations. That didn’t stop the song from topping the Dutch charts

But why would this song be released close to the occupation of Wounded Knee? The answer is honestly simple; Redbone were supporters of AIM, with a majority of their early proceeds helping to fund the organization. 

“We Were All Wounded at Wounded Knee” is chanted in the chorus, telling us that even though the massacre and occupation affected Indigenous peoples, everyone was harmed by those events. At the very end, Redbone changes the chorus to “We were all wounded by Wounded Knee,” further cementing the message that Wounded Knee affected everyone, not just the Indigenous Americans who were at those events. 

As time moves forward, we can’t lose sight of the events that led us to where we are. As long as “We Were All Wounded at Wounded Knee” is played, these stories will continue to be told, and we will continue to remember the devastating effects that colonialism has on everyone to this day. 

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About the Contributor
Ashe Burr
Ashe Burr, Writer
Ashe is a second year student majoring in both professional and public writing and linguistics. The resident international music aficionado at the station, they can be found constantly seeking out new music from all corners of the globe. When not looking through music, they can be found with the Spartan Marching Band Color Guard and State of Art Winterguard. "Might be bleeding, but don't you mind, I'll be fine." - Cornelia Jakobs

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