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City Pulse – 4/3/13

This week, City Pulse’s own Larry Cosentino joins Berl in-studio to elaborate on the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) which was discussed in the Supreme Court last Wednesday. We also hear from Walnut Neighborhood resident, Dale Schrader, on developments  in the ongoing pole barn dispute. Later, Lansing Councilwoman Carol Wood discusses the 2014 fiscal budget.

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Bound Stems – Passing Bell

It’s hard to describe the sound of Chicago’s Bound Stems. They give an interesting perspective on noise/indie/pop rock that can only be compared to the likes of Modest Mouse or Franz Ferdinand. Though they broke up in 2008, there are four EPs and two albums out there that are definitely worth checking out. New bands formed from the ashes of Bound Stems include Like Pioneers and Sleepy Kitty. If you’re as confused as I am by this description, check out their song “Passing Bell” off their 2008 album The Family Afloat below. Read More…

Gym Class Heroes – Everyday’s Forecast

When one hears the words “Gym Class Heroes,” one tends to think of Travis “Travie” McCoy, Fueled By Ramen, and pop songs about Myspace. There was a time before all of these things in which Gym Class Heroes ruled the indie-hip hop game. Their second album The Papercut Chronicles is incredibly thoughtful, sincere, and even a bit harsh at times, but it features a band of extremely talented guitarists, a bassist, and a drummer (no computer beats or samples in this one). Somewhere along the way, they seemed to get a bit lazy. Travis McCoy went from writing songs about luck, loss, love and depression to writing about Myspace, sleeping with your teachers, and taking your clothes off. Complicated beats and creative guitar lines shifted to played out computer beats and less interesting samples and melodies. Check out the song “Everyday’s Forecast” off their 2003 album The Papercut Chronicles below. Read More…

The Basement – 3/28/13

Thanks to Januzzi Watchmen for hanging out with us tonight. Be sure to tune in next week when we have Mike Mains & the Branches stop by.

Here’s tonight’s playlist:

Narco Debut – Poppyseed

A Band Called Mithras – Robot Clowns

Deastro – Greens, Grays, and Nordics Read More…

Benjy Ferree – In the Countryside

Washington, D.C-based Benjy Ferree plays an eclectic form of rock that changes from song to song on and album to album. Switching from straight-laced indie rock to back-country folk to simple-structured rock, he’ll always keep you guessing. When on a rock kick, he almost sounds like a Jack White impersonator with a Neutral Milk Hotel cover band playing behind him. Check out the odd video for his track “In the Countryside” off his debut album Leaving the Nest below. Read More…

City Pulse – 3/27/13

This week Bill Mathewson, general council member in the Michigan Municipal League calls in to elaborate on the Open Meetings Act, Berl speaks with Alice Brinkman, founder of the REACH Studio Art Center, who calls in to discuss the accessibility of art within the school system, and Gail Philbin talks about big agriculture and what it’s doing to our farmland. Later we hear former and current mayor, David Hollister and Virg Bernero, talk about the budget for the city of East Lansing.

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Manchester Orchestra – Tony the Tiger

Despite their name, heavy rockers Manchester Orchestra are not from the UK. Hailing from Atlanta, the band started making music their senior year of high school in 2004. The son of a preacher, brainchild Andy Hull writes deep, soulful rock with a lick of southern flair. And then there’s that voice; nasally, crackly, and a little whiny, but in none of the ways that you’re thinking. Keep a look out for Andy Hull’s tweets as the band is currently recording their fourth album. If you’re digging this, be sure to listen to Andy Hull’s side project with Kevin Devine called Bad Books. Check out the song “Tony the Tiger” off their 2009 release Mean Everything To Nothing below. Read More…

The Dig – Two Sisters In Love

New York City-based The Dig make haze-laced music that could be closely categorized as Desert Rock. With a driving, yet lazy feel, The Dig do a great job of mixing straight-forward rock with the sonic qualities of more atmospheric music. Some have described them as “eerie post-punk.” The band is often compared to The Strokes solely due to the fact that they used to practice right next door to them.

Check out the track “Two Sisters In Love” off their 2010 debut album Electric Toys below. Read More…

Electric President – Ten Thousand Lines

Ben Cooper has been making music under many names, but when Alex Kane joins in to form Electric President, things are taken to a whole new level. A perfect mix of electronic and indie, the two Floridians can span the entire range of human emotion in the limits of one song. At times beautiful, at times creepy, and at time both, Electric President and subsequent albums contain very thoughtful, well-structured songs that can have a profound effect on the music experience. If you’re digging this, be sure to look up some of Ben Cooper’s other projects Radical Face, Iron Orchestra, Helicopter Project, and Mother’s Basement.

Listen to “Ten Thousand Lines” off their 2006 self-titled, debut album below. Read More…

Alice and Michi – Fighters

New York-based Alice and Michi really have no formula for making music. When they sat down to write music, it was unclear who would be playing what instrument, who would be singing, and what they would even be writing about. Six months later, Strange Bloom was finished. In a genre known as “chamber pop,” there really aren’t any rules, but Alice and Michi seemed to still be able to break them. A mixture of electronic and jazz, Alice and Michi make minimalist dream pop slathered in effervescent harmonies. Check out their song “Fighters” off their 2012 album Strange Bloom below. Read More…

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